Start Over

DTSPpaperSometimes things just don’t go right. When this occurs, do you push on, ignoring what’s not working or do you stop and reassess? Sometimes, the best approach is to start over. Yes, it is a drag to erase all the time and effort you have already spent, but continuing may take more time and effort, with no results.

Starting over can apply to projects, members of your team or your own performance. How do you decide when it is time to start over? Some things to consider in your decision are: whether further action, on the same course, will make any difference, what results you have seen so far, what obstacles you are facing and whether they are surmountable, if there is a better way to accomplish your goal and what may happen if you do not start over.

There is nothing wrong with starting over. What matters is getting things done and if starting over will get you where you want to be, go for it.

 

Photo: deathtothestockphoto.com

Liking The People You Work With

ID-100127058Liking the people you work with is not mandatory for a successful career. However if you do like them, you have a better chance of success in your work. What do I mean by “like”? I mean having a level of professional compatibility that allows you to thrive in a team. This creates conditions that foster your success. If you like your co-workers as people, then you can add fun and enjoyment to the mix.

This is not a pie-in-the-sky concept. If you do not like the people you work with, your working conditions are less than optimal. You may find yourself irritated, less productive and discouraged. A positive workplace lets you thrive and move forward.

Do you like the people you work with?

 

photo: jscreationzs, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Free Flow Management – 5 – Increasing Structure Where It Is Needed

ID-100113680Free Flow Management honors freedom and calls for a balance of freedom and structure. What happens if you have a team member who cannot “handle” freedom and whose performance suffers without a balance that overly favors structure?

Flow is the centerpiece of Free Flow Management. In this situation, honor your team member’s need for structure, initially. If their performance is suffering, ask them what they need to bring their performance up again. Co-create a structure with them to do this. At the same time, coach them to find ways they can become more comfortable with freedom. One of the premises of Free Flow Management is that freedom leads to creativity, innovation and fulfillment. Help your team member align with your balance of freedom and structure.

You do not want to regress and do not have to increase structure permanently just because one team member needs it. You want to keep things flowing. Obstructions need to be addressed and flow regained.

 

photo: sritangphoto, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

What’s Possible?

ID-100303213We often think about what’s practical, what’s immediate and what’s required. How about turning your focus on what’s possible? Think noun (potential) rather than adjective (able to be done). Doing so can lead to innovation, engagement and progress.

Let the mundane go for a while and dream – in the present moment – of what’s possible. Is there somewhere you could make your mark? What effort is needed? Break through the small mind to new directions, solutions and accomplishments. You can do it.

What’s possible for you and for your team today?

 

photo: Stuart Miles, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Will You “Spring” Into Spring?

ID-100174472Spring: To rise, leap, move, or act suddenly and swiftly, as by a sudden thrust forward or outward, or being suddenly released from a coiled or constrained position.

Spring starts in the northern hemisphere on March 20th. Whether March 20th is the start of Spring for you or not, the thought here is to move into action and take a leap in your life and career. What is waiting for you to leap to it? What is currently constraining you, that you can leap away from?

What’s one thing you could do that would make a positive and significant difference in your life and career – something that you’d be proud to do? Identify what it is, get into action and commit to make it happen!

 

photo: Vlado, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Where’s Your Enthusiasm?

ID-100292598Do enthusiasm and work go together? They should! Enthusiasm is defined as: intense and eager enjoyment, interest, or approval. You can lose your enthusiasm or you can maintain it – it’s up to you. Perhaps you rarely feel enthusiasm for your work. If that is the case, take another look – what has happened? Did you start your career with a perception that work is drudgery? Did something dampen your enthusiasm? Is what you are doing each day not in alignment with your likes or interests?

If you have enthusiasm for your work, kudos to you! You put a lot into your work each day and enthusiasm assures your engagement and motivation. You deserve to be Working Happy!

photo: stock images, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Where Are You Heading?

ID-10030336If someone came to you now and asked, “Where are you heading?” how would you answer for you and your team? Focus is a huge part of moving forward and attaining success. When you focus your efforts and energies and those of your team, you greatly increase your chances of getting where you want to be.

What did you want to achieve in 2014? Have you? Will you? How strong is your and your team’s focus on where you want to be? Has anything derailed or diverted you?

As you approach 2015, have you thought about where you will be heading?

 

photo: africa, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Ten Manager Tolerations You Can Do Without

ID-10071537In a previous blog post I wrote about  the effects of tolerating negative people or situations. Here are ten examples of manager tolerations you are better off without.

1. A team member who is disrupting the flow of your team’s work.

2. A colleague who uses intimidation to get what he or she wants.

3. A messy, unorganized desk.

4. A culture that defines productivity as the number of hours you stay at the office, rather than the results of your work.

5. An unclear mission.

6. Too many unproductive meetings.

7. Compensation way below your contribution.

8. Sloppy performance reviews.

9. Disrespect.

10. Work that has no meaning for you.

 What are you tolerating now that you could do without?

 

photo: scottchan, FreeDigital Photos.net

 

Ten Ways To Shine As A Leader

ID-1002063901. Be your authentic self. This means no “shoulds” and being true to your values.

2. Get enough rest, so you can be at your best.

3. Treat all with respect and fairness.

4. Continuously sharpen your skills and know that the growing and learning never stops.

5. Do your best to live fully in the present moment.

6. Enjoy your work and encourage others to do the same.

7. Develop a positive relationship with time (See my previous blog post)

8. Use technology to create efficiencies.

9. Go to 10,000 feet every once in awhile, in order to see the bigger picture.

10. Acknowledge your accomplishments and those of others.

 

photo: samarttiw, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

What Is Your Best Skill?

ID-100273537-2

It always is advisable to know yourself well – your strong and weak points, preferences and aversions, style and talents. What is your best skill? Are you capitalizing on it? Does your current work demand the use of that skill? Is your skill recognized by others?

Your best skill should be showcased. It’s in your interest that it is.

 

photo: Stuart Miles, FreeDigitalPhotos.net