Enough Already!

It is late at night and I am down to the line in writing this blog post. It has to be done, so here I am. It has been a packed week and my sentiment is “enough, already”.

What do you do when you hit this place? Do you push on or give it up? Of course, different circumstances create different responses. Maintaining your balance, realizing sometimes you have to give an extra push and knowing your limits help you cope. Here’s hoping you do not reach this place too often. And now my post is done. ☺

 

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The Power In Allowing

So many times you can find yourself fighting reality. You don’t like the way things are, so you resist. Doing so does not serve you. It expends your energy and takes your time, usually with little result. Alternatively, you can find the power in allowing.

Allowing refers to using the way things are as your starting point. It does not mean that you accept the way things are; just that you see things clearly and go from there. Doing so gets rid of any illusions and lets you address a situation as it is. Then, you are better able to protect your interests and achieve your desired result.

 

photo: Alexas-Fotos, pixabay.com

More Of That!

What jazzes you and makes you happy? Are those things present in your work life? True, there are some separations that must exist between life and work. However, following a path for your career that includes what makes you happy can bring you significant benefits. Too often, our society sends messages that we are not meant to be happy at work. In reality, being happy with your work leads to productivity, success, purpose and fulfillment.

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Double-Edged Sword

Double-edged sword is a phrase I often heard as I grew up. Its meaning is that something has two sides to consider. Something that looks great could have a negative side. A course of action may have both positive and negative effects. Something has both advantages and disadvantages.

You don’t have to run away from a double-edged sword. Best, however, to develop the ability to see beyond one edge to the other. Cultivate discernment as you evaluate situations. Make sure you see the whole picture and don’t get caught by the glitter of one edge.

 

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Go Ahead…

In my last post, I wrote about the importance of how you treat people. A recent Medium article by Benjamin P. Hardy has some interesting advice on how to interact with others: treat everyone as if they are dealing with serious challenges.

I find this advice intriguing. In order to follow it, you turn around the norms of interaction and make big assumptions, that may not be true. The power in this, however, is that you treat every person with kindness and compassion, whether their present circumstances are challenging or not. If this is the concept that gets you there, so be it.

 

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How Do You Treat People?

Knowing how you treat people is an aspect of emotional intelligence. How you communicate with others directly impacts the nature of your interactions. For example, if you treat people with respect, you may get respect in return. If you are rushed in your communications because you have things to do, others may feel disregarded. Of course, your ways of treating others may vary according to the nature of your day and the person you are interacting with.

How do you treat others? What are the values and methods of communication you employ? Do your own emotions affect how you treat others? Does how people treat you impact your communication?

Take a moment to reflect on how you treat people. Doing so can lead to better communication and less stressful interactions with others.

 

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A Can-Do Attitude

My Mom was a Rosie The Riveter during World War II in southern California. You know the motto: “We Can Do It!”

How does a “can-do” attitude fit into your work life? Has it been stifled by work cultures that discourage creativity and individual initiative? Has it been encouraged by those who realize the power of empowering workers? A “can-do” attitude serves you well. If you do not have many opportunities to cultivate it – find some.

A can-do attitude is contagious and leads you to opportunities you will never find by standing still.

 

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True Voice

Do you know your true voice? You may not speak your true voice in every encounter; however, there are some encounters where it is essential. Your true voice comes from within. It embodies your values, reflects your integrity, sets your boundaries and protects you.

Things can get sticky when you do not know or speak your true voice. Others can take advantage of or manipulate you. You can be forced into situations that do not honor your values or boundaries. If you have yet to find your true voice, here are some questions to answer that can get you started:

• What is non-negotiable in your life – things you will not do?

• What are your three most important values?

• What lines can people not cross with you?

Your true voice is the expression of you. Know it and your path will be illuminated, leading to a centered and fulfilling life.

 

photo: jeffery-hamilton, unsplash.com

Work Is Family?

A recent New York Times column, Your Workplace Isn’t Your Family (And That’s OK!) , has a warning for people who see work as family: put yourself first.

Do you see your co-workers as family? It is easy to go to that place. You spend so much time with them. You want to be accepted. You work as a team. It is important to distinguish that “family” as you know it at home, is an illusion in the workplace. You can redefine family for your workplace; however be sure you have no confusion – work is not family.

Work can be a rewarding and rich experience with lasting relationships, yes. However, remember you are at work to perform and reach common goals, that may not be your own. You have to look out for you.

 

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