Chunking It Down

In my training at The Coaches Training Institute, they introduced a concept called “Chunking It Down”. It is a very effective way of managing, organizing and dealing with overwhelm. Chunking it down is simple – you take a task that has multiple parts and break it down into small, actionable steps.

Anything you are working on now that could benefit from chunking it down? Give it a try. It keeps you moving and is great for reducing stress.

 

photo: shilmar, pixabay.com

Balancing

How often do you look at the actual act of balancing your life? You may know when your life is balanced, when it is not and the level of balance you want to achieve. That’s good. From there, how do you, day-to-day, maintain that balance?

Balancing is a “present moment” thing. It asks your awareness of when you are slipping out of balance, your knowing how to regain your balance and your agility in dealing with time. Think of a situation when maintaining your balance was very challenging. It may have been a time when you were facing competing demands, had too much to get done in the time you had or were experiencing work – personal life tensions. What did you do? Were you able to maintain balance or did things go awry?

Focusing on the act or art of balancing serves you. How do you best maintain your balance on a day-to-day basis? What do you do to regain your balance if it is lost? Develop your skill for balancing and you’ll soon find yourself mastering it.

 

photo: pexels.com

What Is Wellness For You?

It could be getting enough rest and relaxation or running a marathon. What is wellness for you? To answer this question, look comprehensively at the physical, mental and emotional aspects of your life. Wellness is personal.

What do you need to feel a sense of wellness? It is worth your time to answer this question and make room in your life for the things you identify. Doing this, increases your productivity, fulfillment and happiness. Get on your road to wellness and reap the benefits.

 

photo: PlumePloume, pixabay.com

The Razor’s Edge

Some situations bring you to the razor’s edge. You find yourself having to make serious judgments and decisions very quickly. The actions you take could have serious consequences and you have little time. What’s the best way to survive on the razor’s edge?

When you find yourself on the razor’s edge, be aware that you are on a thin precipice and have two ways you can fall. Do your best to stay centered and watch out for your best interests. Be aware of those around you who are involved in the situation. It’s a balancing act. You can do it if you know where you are and what is at stake.

 

photo: moritz320, pixabay.com

Despite The Pull

Sometimes, it takes extra effort to keep things going. It may be that your motivation is low, you are not feeling well or something or someone outside you is making things difficult. How do you keep going, despite the pull?

First, assess whether what you are trying to do is important for you to get done. If it is, look next at whether you have what you need to keep going. If you do, find ways to increase your motivation – perhaps by rewarding yourself or rethinking your reluctance. If you don’t, get what you need.

When you feel a pull or drag on something you are doing, recognize that it is there and minimize its ability to take you off course. Focus moves you forward. Delay holds you back and doesn’t serve you.

 

photo: Derks24, pixabay.com

The Power of “Pivoting”

There is a concept called pivoting that encourages you to move from a negative attitude to a positive one. Do you know how to pivot? Consider a time when you were in a bad or negative mood and you successfully got out of it. How did you do it?

I pivot by quickly getting to my center, becoming quiet and observing what put me in a negative state. Then, I choose what I want to do next. In some cases, my mood is deep, so I find music that helps me get into a positive state, take a break from a situation or find positive ways to view what is happening. I always, however, acknowledge and validate how I feel before pivoting.

The best pivoting techniques are often an individual choice. Here are some that I have seen people use:

• Having a mantra or affirmation that changes perspective when needed

• Acknowledging that “this too shall pass”

• Finding something that creates happiness (quickly)

• Deciding firmly how to deal with a negative situation, speak truth about it and move on

• Knowing how to center quickly, in order to gain perspective

• Getting out of a long-term situation that has too much negativity

Pivoting serves you and keeps you at your best. Build your skill at pivoting and the view you see will be a good one!

 

photo: geralt, pixabay.com

Starting With You

“It is folly for him to rule over others who cannot govern himself.”  – Publius Syrus

Are some of you shaking your heads in agreement with this quote? How many of you have had managers who have little self-awareness and prove it, over and over again, as they manage others? So much of success involves knowledge of people and how they interact. How can you gain this knowledge without knowing yourself – what motivates you, what disconnects you, what you need to collaborate effectively?

How well do you know yourself? How well do you understand what motivates and engages others with whom you work? Your effectiveness as a team member or manager starts with you!

 

photo: Min_An, pixabay.com

Who Cares?

Do you ever find yourself at work saying, “Who cares?” It can be a defense mechanism when you are angry, upset, disappointed or fearful. Other times, it is a statement of truth – you are detached and do not care about a situation.

This is worth paying attention to. Detachment and apathy about your work are warning signals that it may be time for a change. Work is best when engaged in. How are you feeling presently about your work? Are you saying “ Who Cares?” or “I Care!”?

 

photo: Ben_Kerckx, pixabay.com