It’s Okay To Be In-Between

 

At times, you may find yourself neither here nor there. You are not where you were a year ago and not quite settled into something new. Perhaps you have undergone a tangible change or nothing has changed, except that you are different in your own perceptions of your life and work.

Nothing wrong with that! You are on a journey. You change over time and not instantaneously. When you feel you are in-between, maybe even a bit lost, get present to it. Try to understand where you are and make the most of it. It can be a time of new insights, growth and creating new dreams, before you reach the next step on your journey.

 

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Waking Up

Sometimes things are hiding in plain sight; however, you fail to see them. There can be many reasons: an expectation or strong emotion like anger clouds your view, what is there creates fear for you, you have not experienced anything like it before and therefore fail to recognize it, you are not fully present to what is going on, you are avoiding seeing it or a need to please prevents you from acknowledging what is there.

Being asleep to something is human. It’s not hard to find yourself there. Key is to will yourself “awake” to what is happening around you in your workplace. The benefits are obvious. By seeing the truth of a situation you can assess it appropriately and decide how to respond in a manner that is best for you and your career.

 

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5 Ways To Cope With A Dysfunctional Work Environment

Would that all workplaces operate smoothly and efficiently! When that’s not the case, here are five ways to handle a dysfunctional work environment.

1. Place responsibility where it should be and do not take too much on your own shoulders.

2. Find your space within your workplace and do your job in as high quality a manner as possible.

3. Speak up when what you have to say has a chance of lessening the dysfunction.

4. Develop your emotional intelligence.

5. If the work environment is hampering you in significant ways, start looking at your options to get out of it.

 

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Are You Asking “What’s The Use?

You have a right to a sense of meaning in your work. That sense of meaning can be hindered by things such as: a wrong fit with the work you are doing, values not being honored, a dysfunctional workplace or a lack of resources or skills to do your job.

When you find yourself asking, “What’s the use?” take a look at the source of your frustration. Once you discover it, do what you can to remedy the situation. In that way, you assure that your work fulfills you. It’s better for you and for the world.

 

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Daydreams

Do you ever daydream? Daydreams are much more than “fluff”. They can be functional and lead to positive changes in your career. You can put daydreams to work for you by focusing them on what you want in your work life. They provide a creative, open space for your imagination to flow.

Allow yourself a few daydreams about your work and career. In a quiet space, let your imagination go on what a great work situation would be for you. Imagine how it happens and how you feel. See what shows up. Even if what shows up seems impractical, don’t push it away. Give it some more thought. Your daydreams may be guiding you to somewhere great!

 

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Yes/No: A Way To Set Your Boundaries

In coaching there is a tool named “Yes/No”. Its purpose is to help you set boundaries when you need to. Say you are in a situation where you are being asked to work very long hours on a project and upper management is putting a lot of burden on staff, without providing the resources needed to get the job done. The situation is draining your energy and frustrating you.

To employ the yes/no tool you would make a list of what you say yes to and what you say no to in the situation. Here are some examples:

• I say yes to maintaining a standard of quality on the project, so that it does not fail.

• I say yes to asking management for what I need to get the job done.

• I say no to draining my energy and getting out of balance because of the long hours and frustration of the project.

• I say no to taking responsibility beyond what I can reasonably do or for what is upper management’s responsibility.

Yes/No is a powerful tool that helps you to maintain the boundaries that you need to thrive and excel in your work!

 

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Wait!

You have an intuitive voice within that sometimes tries to quietly caution you. When you are not sure whether to act, best to wait. Stop for a while and assess what you are about to do. By waiting, you build confidence in your intended action, uncover better approaches and identify any obstacles involved. Then, once you have waited, you can act with the prospect of much better results.

Is there anything you are considering doing, but something tells you it may not be good for you? Try waiting and make your path forward a clearer one.

 

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Does Something Need A Push?

How are things moving for you in your work and career? At times, your goals and dreams need a push – from you! Take a moment to look at the top three things you want to achieve this year. Are they on track or are they faltering?

Your “push” can take many forms – giving more of your time and attention, soliciting help from others, changing your approach or quickening your pace. Giving your goals a push, when needed, gets you where you want to be!

 

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Moments Of Peace

Ah, those moments when your cares and all the demands on you fall away. Treasure them.

How often do you find yourself in moments of peace? They are a time to replenish, center, rest and listen. Let yourself consciously enjoy them and use them well!

 

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Sometimes, Things Are Strained

Your emotions and what is happening in the environment you work in are not constant. They are frequently changing. It makes sense that they affect your experience of work and managing.

When you or your environment become strained what do you attribute it to? Are you even aware of the strain or do you react to it without identifying the factors that are causing it? Here is another place where it behooves you to pause and assess. By being aware of your emotions and environment and their effects on what you are feeling, you can deal with the strain head-on, instead of being victim to it.

 

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