How Do You Describe Your Work?

The way you describe the work you do can offer valuable insights. Work can be described in many ways: the nature of your work (specifics of what you “do”), the emotions you have about your work (love, hate, tolerate) or your goals for your work and career.

Take a moment now and describe your work. See what it reveals and proceed from there.

 

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Ten Ways To Spark Your Curiosity

In my last blog post, I wrote about the power of curiosity. Here are ten ways to get your curiosity in motion.

1. Make an intention to develop a new skill in the next six months.

2. Do something you have never done before.

3. Do something backwards.

4. Go into nature and find five things you have never seen before.

5. Prepare to do something that you have resisted doing in the past.

6. Study an animal – its characteristics and way of being in the world.

7. Develop the least used of your five senses.

8. Read a book about something unknown to you.

9. Create a “stretch” goal that brings you further than you have ever thought of going.

10. Spend an hour on youtube exploring a subject of interest to you.

photo: pexels.com

Letting Yourself Be “Placed”

 

Are you looking  for a sense of security and knowing in the world? If you are, you can sometimes rush things by letting society tell you who you should be. Society certainly has life mapped out, if you want to take that path.

Letting someone or something else “place” you in the world doesn’t always work out. It can appear to be safe and certain, that’s true. However, your journey is meant to be walked by you; not someone else. When you walk your journey and make your own choices, there may be challenges, but you have a greater chance of reaching fulfillment in your life.

Chart your own path. Being true to yourself increases your chances of being “placed” in just the right place for you.

 

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Move Towards, Not Away

It is a natural reaction, when you do not favor something, to move away from it. Sometimes, that is just the right thing to do. Other times, your reaction may be motivated by fear or another emotion that really does not serve your best interests. In that case, if you move away, it harms you.

Learn to discern when you should move towards something, rather than away from it. Examples could be an opportunity to develop a skill, a chance to repair a relationship, something that stretches you in a positive way or something that releases a negative aspect of your life. Have the courage to make things better.

Moving towards something moves you forward, so move forward, in your own interests, whenever you can!

 

photo: RobinHiggins, pixabay.com

Are You Comfortable Being Uncomfortable?

Oh, if life was a smooth ride without discomfort. Not! Your level of comfort with discomfort is a factor in your ability to cope and thrive in life and work. There are numerous reactions you can have to being uncomfortable – anxiety, fear and avoidance are a few.

There are benefits to developing a response to discomfort that serves you, rather than only reacting. This starts with facing your emotion of discomfort. Look it in the eye and acknowledge it. Then, break it down in pieces – what is going on? Decide what its cause is and what you can do about it. As you do this over time, being uncomfortable will start to lose its power. You may even get comfortable with being uncomfortable! ☺

 

photo: Blake Cheek, unsplash.com

Checking In On Chaos

There is a lot of chaos in the world right now. Values and norms are being upended daily. Whether you see the chaos as helpful or disconcerting, it is good to check in with yourself every once in awhile.

Why? Chaos has the ability to upend both you and your life when you don’t pay attention. Chaos also creates energy that you can use for constructive purposes, presenting you with an opportunity to change things for the better.

How is the chaos in our world affecting you, right now? What do you want to do in response to it?

 

photo: Erik Eastman, unsplash.com

Feeding Fear Instead Of Stopping It

Fear is unpleasant and disconcerting. It can show up in life and work, with people you love and those you don’t, in unfamiliar situations and because other people are promoting it.

If you don’t like feeling fear, make sure not to feed it. Fear can get a grip on you very quickly. It has a power of its own and takes courage and strength to deal with. Learn to recognize and understand your fear. Once it shows up, find ways to stop it, rather than letting it grow.

You can stop fear in many ways: by grounding in the present moment and looking at the cause of your fear and by finding techniques to deal with it such as employing ways to calm yourself down, engaging in physical exercise or identifying the usual causes of your fear and addressing them directly.

The next time you feel fear best to stop it, rather than feed it. Fear slows you down and scares you. Your life and work are better off without it.

 

photo: Aarón Blanco Tejedor, unsplash.com

Pushing

Sometimes frustration, fear, worry or panic can get you to a point of pushing harder and harder to change a situation. It is worth your while to carefully consider any inclination you have to push and push. Depending on what is driving you, pushing hard can send you off a cliff. Why? Because you are reacting not responding, you have likely lost your center and you are basing your actions on emotion, without the balance of your mind.

The next time you find yourself pushing hard, take a moment to examine how you can handle what is happening to your best advantage.

 

photo: xu-haiwei, unsplash.com