Who Cares?

Do you ever find yourself at work saying, “Who cares?” It can be a defense mechanism when you are angry, upset, disappointed or fearful. Other times, it is a statement of truth – you are detached and do not care about a situation.

This is worth paying attention to. Detachment and apathy about your work are warning signals that it may be time for a change. Work is best when engaged in. How are you feeling presently about your work? Are you saying “ Who Cares?” or “I Care!”?

 

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Getting Away And Your Perspective

Vacations and times spent away from work are always helpful to refresh your perspective on things. You don’t have to wait for them, however. There are other ways to change your perspective by getting away. Here are some of them:

• Spend a day out in the “field” (whatever that may be for your work) observing and interacting

• Solicit feedback and opinions from people around you, as well as from people you are not as closely involved with

• Find a completely new way to look at a situation and see if it fits

• Give some open contemplation time to difficult issues and see what your intuition tells you

• Physically get away from your normal work environment for short periods of time

Refreshing your perspective feeds clear thinking, creativity and momentum. Doing it often serves you.

 

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Am I Supposed To Be Excited?

As a teen, this was a phrase I used often thinking I was so nonchalant. Actually, today, it may have some relevance to your career and work life. All workplaces have expectations of the organization as a whole and of individual people within the organization. Some of these expectations relate to what you are supposed to be excited about – possibly a new mission, behaviors within the organization or your contribution to the organization.

Perhaps, in adult life, this is not a nonchalant question. What are you excited about in your work life? What do others expect you to be excited about? What are you not excited about that may be an indication that changes are needed?

 

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No Man’s Land

In tennis, there is a space on the court where you are not close enough to pick a ball off the net and not far enough back to reach a hard-hit ball. This space is called no man’s land.

You can find yourself in no man’s land in your work as well, when your next move is not clear to you or you are not in a place that allows you to move. When you are in no man’s land, the first step is to recognize that you are there. It is not a place for blame, giving up or staying still. It is a place for movement. Do what you have to to get yourself where you want to be.

 

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Too Far Out There

Is there anything relating to your career that you sometimes think about, but soon dismiss as “too far out there”? It is possible there’s something in it for you. Say there is a part of you that wants to take a big leap, however you are very good at convincing yourself why you can’t do it. In our dreams are clues to what can make us happy. You may be missing out.

If there is something that intrigues you, but you think is too far out there, start with small steps. Ask yourself what it is that draws you to the idea. Look at what part(s) of it may be attainable. Dismiss any negativity about it. You may find that what you thought was too far out there, is just right!

 

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Money, Money, Money

What role does money play in your life and work? Some think that money makes the world go round. Others love it to death. Some think money is the root of all evil. People project so much onto money. What is it really but a means of exchange? Best that you put it in its rightful place.

One thing that is worth your focus is the nature of your relationship with money. Your relationship with money is often influenced by the events and experiences of your early life on through to the present day. What has formed your relationship with money in your life? What emotions do you feel when you think about money? Be aware of these things. Best to understand how money moves in your world and how you can use it to create the life and work you desire.

Speaking of money, there is a podcast, The Money Millhouse, by Ellie Kay and Bethany Bayless that I am a huge fan of. I joined Ellie and Bethany on April 23 for a fun interview on coaching and money. AND The Money Millhouse is offering a free download of my book, Power Stories to listeners!

Please check it all out on iTunes , Google Play , Stitcher  or on The Money Millhouse website.

 

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Getting Back Up

It happens: you fall and find yourself down on the ground. Setbacks, failures, surprises and disruptions can all create a fall. When you experience this, how do you get back up on your feet and start moving again?

Here are some things that have helped me get back up after a fall:

• Getting fully present to what has happened and figuring out where I am with it.

• Looking forward and not focusing too much on what has happened.

• Identifying the best things I can do to get back up.

• Finding a way to not get pushed right back down again.

The next time you fall, whether caused by your actions or those of others, have a strategy for getting back up. Brush yourself off and come back to the game.

 

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Can You Be Authentic At Work?

There’s a lot involved in being authentic. It is about being true to yourself, being transparent and speaking your truth. Is authenticity valued at your workplace? Do others want to hear from you? A lot can interfere with authenticity in the workplace. You may want to maintain an “image” that you believe can lead you to success. You may value emotional intelligence as an essential factor in teamwork and collaboration and allow it to influence your authenticity in certain situations. You may discern that speaking your truth does not serve you. Where do you draw the line between your authenticity and the nature of your workplace?

Whether you can be authentic at work is a question that you have to answer. It is worth paying attention to so that you do not lose yourself as you work.

 

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How Do You Handle Discouragement?

It happens – you get down. All kinds of things can cause you to feel discouraged – personal interactions, failures and mistakes, dashed hopes, unrealized expectations, unfairness. How do you handle discouragement when it shows up in your work?

Here are some aspects of discouragement to look at: your mood darkens, your self-confidence dives, your optimism wanes, your body language reflects your feeling. What are these things about? A lot of them are about your perspective. Acknowledging this can help you deal with discouragement.

Next time you feel discouraged, try changing your perspective. It may take time, but muster your optimism and realize this too shall pass. Find constructive actions you can take to either remedy the situation or prevent the chances of its happening again. Look carefully of the root causes of your discouragement and if you can eliminate any of them. Before you know it your discouragement will dissipate and you will be your confident self again!

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