Stability

Although stability can be fleeting, it is still worthwhile to focus on creating it. Stability is a foundation – you know your values, you know the elements of your life, you know your strengths and weaknesses and you have goals and a sense of the direction you want to go in. True, all kinds of things can upset your stability. It is easier, however, to regain stability after an upset if you had it before the upset occurred.

Adding change or upset to chaos and lack of direction creates instability and can wreak havoc in your life and career.

Looking to assess your level of stability? Here are some questions to get you started:

• What are the elements of your life that you can count on?

• How secure do you feel in your current work/career?

• Do you trust your instincts?

• Have you any true assurances that what you have now will stay around for a while?

• How well have you prepared for recovering from a crisis (e.g. loss of a job)?

• Have you identified your key life values? Do you honor them daily?

• How comfortable are you in dealing with change?

“True stability results when presumed order and presumed disorder are balanced. A truly stable system expects the unexpected, is prepared to be disrupted, waits to be transformed.” – Tom Robbins

 

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More Of That!

What jazzes you and makes you happy? Are those things present in your work life? True, there are some separations that must exist between life and work. However, following a path for your career that includes what makes you happy can bring you significant benefits. Too often, our society sends messages that we are not meant to be happy at work. In reality, being happy with your work leads to productivity, success, purpose and fulfillment.

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Balancing

How often do you look at the actual act of balancing your life? You may know when your life is balanced, when it is not and the level of balance you want to achieve. That’s good. From there, how do you, day-to-day, maintain that balance?

Balancing is a “present moment” thing. It asks your awareness of when you are slipping out of balance, your knowing how to regain your balance and your agility in dealing with time. Think of a situation when maintaining your balance was very challenging. It may have been a time when you were facing competing demands, had too much to get done in the time you had or were experiencing work – personal life tensions. What did you do? Were you able to maintain balance or did things go awry?

Focusing on the act or art of balancing serves you. How do you best maintain your balance on a day-to-day basis? What do you do to regain your balance if it is lost? Develop your skill for balancing and you’ll soon find yourself mastering it.

 

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Who Cares?

Do you ever find yourself at work saying, “Who cares?” It can be a defense mechanism when you are angry, upset, disappointed or fearful. Other times, it is a statement of truth – you are detached and do not care about a situation.

This is worth paying attention to. Detachment and apathy about your work are warning signals that it may be time for a change. Work is best when engaged in. How are you feeling presently about your work? Are you saying “ Who Cares?” or “I Care!”?

 

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Am I Supposed To Be Excited?

As a teen, this was a phrase I used often thinking I was so nonchalant. Actually, today, it may have some relevance to your career and work life. All workplaces have expectations of the organization as a whole and of individual people within the organization. Some of these expectations relate to what you are supposed to be excited about – possibly a new mission, behaviors within the organization or your contribution to the organization.

Perhaps, in adult life, this is not a nonchalant question. What are you excited about in your work life? What do others expect you to be excited about? What are you not excited about that may be an indication that changes are needed?

 

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No Man’s Land

In tennis, there is a space on the court where you are not close enough to pick a ball off the net and not far enough back to reach a hard-hit ball. This space is called no man’s land.

You can find yourself in no man’s land in your work as well, when your next move is not clear to you or you are not in a place that allows you to move. When you are in no man’s land, the first step is to recognize that you are there. It is not a place for blame, giving up or staying still. It is a place for movement. Do what you have to to get yourself where you want to be.

 

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Too Much Dissonance?

Dissonance: lack of agreement, consistency or harmony; conflict.

Experiencing any dissonance in your work lately (or forever)? Though work may not reach perfection, too much dissonance is unhealthy, unnecessary and inhibits your productivity. Best to minimize dissonance in your work and life.

Sometimes, you can become accustomed to dissonance or even encourage it, towards your own aims. Do so at your peril. To maximize your performance and work happy you need a work life that feeds you. Do an inventory of your work life (relationships and interactions, nature of your work, noise, expectations and time) and estimate the percentage of your time in which you experience dissonance. Is the percentage acceptable or unacceptable to you? If unacceptable, see what’s possible in terms of creating more harmony in your work experience.

 

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Too Far Out There

Is there anything relating to your career that you sometimes think about, but soon dismiss as “too far out there”? It is possible there’s something in it for you. Say there is a part of you that wants to take a big leap, however you are very good at convincing yourself why you can’t do it. In our dreams are clues to what can make us happy. You may be missing out.

If there is something that intrigues you, but you think is too far out there, start with small steps. Ask yourself what it is that draws you to the idea. Look at what part(s) of it may be attainable. Dismiss any negativity about it. You may find that what you thought was too far out there, is just right!

 

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