Is Anything Closing In On You?

When there is a lot for you to keep moving in work and life, things can lose your attention and fall by the wayside. That’s okay for a while, but soon they may come back at you bigger than before. It is important to stay alert to anything that has the potential to or may already be closing in on you.

Early attention to matters lets you handle them calmly and in a manner that suits you. If you let things go too long before addressing them, your choices narrow and difficulty rises.

Take a moment today to put your attention on any situation or task that may be closing in on you. Determine if it is serious and what you can do about it now. Keeping the energy flowing as you juggle life and work prevents things from getting worse and closing in on you.

 

Photo from Andre Furtado, pexels.com

Disruption

explodeopenclipart-vectorspixabayHow do you handle disruptions? Do what you can to prevent them, but they will happen. When disruptions occur, you have a choice in how you respond. You can deny they are happening (futilely), get present and figure out how to handle them, let your emotions take over, walk away or do something that lets them work to your benefit.

Whatever response you choose, there are consequences. Accept that disruptions are part of life and keep them from getting the better of you. That way, your work continues to flow and you may be able to work disruptions in your favor.

 

photo: OpenClipart-Vectors, pixabay.com

When Things Catch Fire

burning match Skitter Photo stocksnap 2We all try to keep things cool and to address problems before they get out of control. However, sometimes things catch fire, such as the escalation of a conflict, a project getting out of control, personnel shortages or major disruptions within an organization. When things catch fire, how do you handle them?

It always pays to step back, if you can, and assess the situation. If you cannot, immediate, temporary action may be needed to put the flames out, such as separating parties or amping up with more personnel to meet a deadline. Be aware of your emotions and stress level when something catches fire. Do you panic or freeze? Do you become fearful? These responses can hinder your effectiveness and should be managed.

When things catch fire, a clear, calm head is your best ally. With that, you can lead and manage well and put the fire out.

 

photo: SkitterPhoto, stocksnap.io

Getting Real

ID-100135697Every once in a while, it’s good to “get real” with yourself. Crisis and opportunity are times when a realistic appraisal of what is happening serves you best. Getting real involves being honest, getting back to the present moment, taking off any rose-color glasses and a bit of courage, as well.

If you were to “get real” with yourself today, what would you focus on? Is there something asking for your attention or something that is getting out of control? If so, go for it. By getting real, you move your life forward in the best possible way.

 

photo: winnond, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

When The Walls Close In

There are times in life when situations you have avoided, or been unable to focus on, come to front and center. Perhaps you have an interpersonal challenge with someone at work, you have not been up front about something when you should have been, you have hidden something about yourself or you have not prepared for something, you should have prepared for.

What do you do when the walls close in? A first suggestion is to breathe. Acknowledge what is happening and that you will deal with it. Accept the choices you have made that got you to this place. Then, get fully in the present moment. To do this, you may have to release some anxiety, fear or other emotions. Often your emotions make a situation appear to be much worse than it isYou need a clear head to decide what your next steps will be. Then, once you have cleared your emotions, focus and determine where to go from here.

If the walls close in (and I hope they never do) you can handle it best by being fully present, acknowledging your emotions and using your brains and hearts to determine what’s next.

photo: luigi diamanti, FreeDigitalPhotos.net