The Power Of A Plan

You may hear a lot about planning for your life and career. Yes, there are a lot of generalities, advice and platitudes out there. If you have let them slip by, take another look. Planning is well worth your effort and time. What does a plan do for you? It focuses your attention, sets your priorities and requires that you think about what you want your career and life to be.

Compare the differences between having a plan and not having one. Which looks better to you? Granted, without a plan you may feel you have more freedom, but planning is about creating freedom by defining the life you want to live and how you can get there.

Do you have a plan for your life and career? If not, try creating one. It can be short or long-term. Tie it to your dreams and aspirations and you’ll be on your way!


photo: suju,

Time “Check – In”

Time is a key factor in your career success. Take a minute today to look at how time has factored into your life and work since the start of 2018. How are you doing with time? If you are doing well, good for you! Keep up what you are doing. If time is getting the better of you, here are a few questions to ask yourself:

• How realistic are my expectations of the things I can get done in terms of the time I have to do them?

• Are stress or distractions getting in the way of using my time well? Am I maintaining the focus that I need to in my work?

• Is being tired or lack of exercise affecting my ability to get things done?

How you are handling time should always be on your radar. For more about your relationship with time, see my blog posts: Your Relationship With Time and Ten Ways To Change Your Relationship With Time


photo: geralt,

On Point

What does it take for you to be “on point”? Being on point increases your influence, productivity, self-confidence and effectiveness.

There is a lot in our world that can pull you off point. These things can be: creating distractions, unsettled emotions, stress and anxiety, poor preparation, being tired, losing focus, being late, falling into dull routine or disliking what you are doing.

Keep yourself on point by being aware of what you need to be at your best!


photo: WayneChristensen,

What’s Next For You?

We are coming towards the end of the year and to the holidays that start to wind things down. It is a good time to think about the year to come. What would you say is “next” for you? Figuring this out helps you focus and set your intent.

Here are a few questions to help you get started:

• How can I grow?

• How has my perspective shifted this year?

• What do I want to leave behind in 2017?

• What am I willing to commit to in 2018?


photo: geralt,

Are You Coasting?

Coasting can be a good thing to do at times. Other times, it may not be. There are right times for coasting: to give yourself a breather, when demands on you are lighter or when you’re on a roll and moving forward requires less effort than usual. Coasting can be harmful, however, when you have someplace to go and are slowing yourself down, when your motivation is low or when you are lost.

The downsides of coasting when you have someplace to go are that you are not getting where you want to be, your resistance can build and you can start falling behind.

Let yourself coast when it makes sense. Otherwise, keep your momentum and focus going so that you can get where you want to be.


photo: PIRO4D,

Quiet Time

Do you place high value on quiet time? Getting it requires strong intention and commitment, with the pace of our world today. Most likely, I do not have to tell you the benefits of quiet time; you know them.

If you are getting enough quiet time, good for you! If you are not, how about starting with a half hour once a week? It’s contagious!



How’s Your Focus Today?

As you read this post, take a moment to assess how well you are focusing today. Are you tackling your top priorities? Are you instead focusing on lesser priorities or allowing yourself to be distracted?

Focus is a present-moment pursuit. It requires your attention and awareness – first, to identify your priorities and then, to stick to them. Keep your focus strong each day and you’ll find yourself moving forward.


photo: pixel2013,

Intentional Distraction

Sometimes, you can be your own worst enemy. One example is when you consciously and intentionally distract yourself from situations and tasks that need to get handled. You can do this when you really do not want to do something, you can’t get yourself to focus or stress or overwhelm is getting the better of you. Intentional distraction does not serve you. It only delays the inevitable and can create complications that you can do without.

Be aware of when you are distracting yourself by learning to recognize when you are being distracted and what is causing your distraction. When you are the cause, find a way to bring yourself back to center and remind yourself of why what you have to do must get done. Intentional distraction is a fool’s errand. It may keep you from something for a while, but ultimately slows you down and the situation and task is still there waiting for your attention.


photo: sdmacdonaldmiller,

“One Thing At A Time”

I remember hearing the phrase “one thing at a time” throughout my childhood. It was a way adults communicated to us that we should not rush. I guess today’s version of the phrase is  “fully present in the moment”.

How are you doing in being present to your tasks at work? Do you rush through things or do you focus, as you need to? It may be worthwhile, in this holiday week, to try out doing one thing at a time. It could have some benefits for you and provide you with valuable insights on how to get things done.

photo: coyot,

Five Steps For Slowing Your Life Down

slowjborn411pixabayDo you feel that the only way to keep up with life is to go faster and faster? That approach can wear you out and get you nowhere fast. What if the key to success and maximum productivity is to slow down your life? Here are five steps you can take to slow your life down.

1. Every two hours, bring yourself fully to the present moment and assess if you are at your best.

2. Identify the signs of your stress and, when they show up, stop and lower your stress.

3. Sharpen your ability to focus on what you are doing.

4. Be ruthlessly realistic with your time.

5. Create one “slow day” each month where you go at a leisurely and pleasurable pace, doing something you love.


photo: jborn411,