Let Go – Now

It is best to let go of things that no longer serve you. In doing so, you make room for the new to come in and eliminate something that is doing you no good. In many instances, you have time to let go. Other times, you have let something stay around too long and it must be let go of now.

Is there anything in your life that you need to let go of now? Perhaps it is a bad habit that is harming you, a relationship that drains you or something that is holding you back in a big way. Heed the urgency. There is no sense in putting it off any longer. Be rid of it and create the life you want to live.

 

photo: lechenie-narkomani, pixabay.com

10 Ways To Find More Freedom In Your Work

freedomBhakti2pixabay1. Define what freedom in your work is for you.
2. Identify where or how you feel constrained or restricted in your work.
3. Identify the obstacles to finding more freedom in your work.
4. Identify any ways that you yourself are limiting your ability to find more freedom in your work (attitudes, perceptions, fears, blocks).
5. Identify the things you cannot change in your work.
6. Commit that you will do what it takes to find more freedom in your work .
7. Take one break a day, where you leave your environment and create some distance from your work. See what comes up for you during this time.
8. Write down 5 benefits of finding more freedom in your work.
9. Believe that freedom is possible.
10. Create more (even a small amount) freedom in your work by the end of this month.

 

photo: Bhakti2, pixabay.com

Free Flow Management – 5 – Increasing Structure Where It Is Needed

ID-100113680Free Flow Management honors freedom and calls for a balance of freedom and structure. What happens if you have a team member who cannot “handle” freedom and whose performance suffers without a balance that overly favors structure?

Flow is the centerpiece of Free Flow Management. In this situation, honor your team member’s need for structure, initially. If their performance is suffering, ask them what they need to bring their performance up again. Co-create a structure with them to do this. At the same time, coach them to find ways they can become more comfortable with freedom. One of the premises of Free Flow Management is that freedom leads to creativity, innovation and fulfillment. Help your team member align with your balance of freedom and structure.

You do not want to regress and do not have to increase structure permanently just because one team member needs it. You want to keep things flowing. Obstructions need to be addressed and flow regained.

 

photo: sritangphoto, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Let It Go

Sometimes, it can be very hard to let something go. Is there something you have been holding on to? You can hold on to many things after their time is up – things such as failures, relationships, grudges, anger and other emotions, destructive memories or regrets. As you hold on, you pay a price. The price can lie in distraction, emotional distress, over-thinking, inability to be fully present in the moment or stagnation. It can be a jail of your own making.

When you release something that is over or no longer serves you, you are free. There is room for something new. You can focus your attention on other things. It may take time to let something go, but it can also happen quickly, once you set your mind to it. The first step is recognition that it is time to release something. Then, you bring yourself to the present moment and a place of clarity about the situation and act – by declaring your intention to let go, doing something concrete to cut a tie or changing behaviors that support the current situation.

What, in your life, or work, is ready for release?

 

photo: Keattikorn, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Untether

Untethering is about freeing yourself from limitations. What ties you down in your role as a manager? There are various ways to untether from these things. You can:

• create efficiencies in the way you work
• stop putting energy into worrying or fretting about things that are out of your control
• eliminate unproductive distractions and energy drains
• minimize the time you spend with people who limit you in some way, spending only the time that is absolutely necessary
• detach a bit , even if just mentally, to sharpen your perspective regarding your work

Your balance, fulfillment and sanity at work depend on your having the freedom you need to perform. Untethering is one way to create that freedom.

photo: Stuart Miles, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Free Flow Management 2 – Letting Go Of Structure

Free Flow Management (see previous blog post) creates freedom for your team, encouraging innovation and the flow of ideas. Key to Free Flow Management is letting go of structure, at least for a while. We have plenty of structure within organizations, but not a lot of freedom. To make room for freedom, some structure has to go.

Freedom and structure can coexist. Are you comfortable with that? Our hierarchical systems have made structure and order primary, often to the exclusion of flexibility and freedom. Structure can be rebalanced with freedom, with great results. As a manager, you may have to get comfortable with a bit of what you perceive as disorder. That very disorder can create freedom.

In your mind now, create an art canvas representing how you manage. Use one color for structure and one for freedom. Fill your canvas with the amount of each color that represents the current balance between structure and freedom for your team. What predominates? Then, create a canvas of what you think is a good balance between the two for you and your team.

What new directions can you take with the balance of structure and freedom that will increase free flow management of your team?

photo: Simon Howden, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

What Price Freedom?

Is freedom anything else than the right to live as we wish? Nothing else. – Epictetus

There is a lot involved in freedom. Is it simply the right to live as you wish? Many times you hear the phrase what price freedom? That question presupposes a price for having freedom.

I think freedom is, to a great extent, determined by the choices you make. What choices have you made in your life regarding your freedom? Do your choices give freedom a priority over other aspects of your life or do other considerations trump freedom?

Freedom runs a wide spectrum. For some, life can be severely restricted by outside forces, very difficult to control. However, for many of us, we have room within which to choose the level of freedom that we have and the price does not have to be feared. Often, society scares us away from freedom in our individual lives by saying that freedom and security are counterbalanced. As you gain freedom, you lose security. To have security, you give up freedom. I think these are false constraints.

Freedom is a factor in managing, as well. How much freedom can you give each individual in an organization? Here too, we are told freedom leads to anarchy and high risk, so has to be constrained. I think the best approach is to value freedom for the creativity, enjoyment and productivity it can bring for your team and to explore ways to allow it to flourish within your organization.

Freedom is too important to let society or others tell you how much of it you can have. You make that decision.

photo: Tina Phillips, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Standing In The Clearing

The start of a new year is a time of freedom, if you allow it to be. You are standing in a clearing having left 2012 and now entering 2013. As you stand and look forward, the landscape is open and waiting for you. You have choices. You can clutter the clearing with things – unessential activities, fears, the priorities of others. Or, you can create a path in the clearing, moving into 2013 with focus and resolve. How does the clearing you are standing in right now look to you? My clearing this year looks open and reflects the freedom I have in going forward. It is also reflects the need for me to shape my path and create what my business will be this year. You have this freedom as well. As you stand in the clearing, shape what your and your team’s year will be and how you will go forward.

 

 

 

 

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