Next Time

As uncomfortable as they are, a lot can be learned from missteps and failures. Making the most of them involves letting what happened teach you what to do and not do the next time that you are in a similar situation. Instead of running from such experiences, identify constructive take-aways, so that the next time you do better.

Think of a recent misstep or failure. Identify your take-aways and put them into practice. That way, you’ll create a practice of continuous improvement that can serve you well.

 

photo: Rampion, pixabay.com

Walk Away

walkawayOliaGozhaunsplashI find the decision to walk away difficult at times. The crux lies in whether the situation is harmful or helpful. A decision to walk away can be a refusal to see something I need to address in order to grow. In that case, it will inevitably return and might as well be dealt with now. Or, a decision to walk away can be an empowering one, through which I can gain strength and wisdom.

When was the last time you walked away from something? How did it work out? Were you empowered or stagnated by your decision? How do you decide whether to stay or walk away?

 

photo: Olia Gozha, unsplash.com

Repass

ID-100194462                   Repass: To pass again; go by again.

Sometimes, you are given an opportunity to look at something again. When an opportunity comes, you can benefit and learn from it. A repass brings a situation in front of you for a second time. I first knowingly experienced a repass just after I started my coaching career. I was asked to consult on an environmental project that brought me back to my previous career. I was working with other consulting firms and soon realized I was looking at my old working environment again. I watched how these firms operated, how their team members were treated and how they did their work. From a distance, this repass gave me new insights on how I used to work, that I could not see before. It also helped me let go of the past and affirm that coaching was my new career, a very different one at that.

Keep your eye out for opportunities that allow you to look again. You’ll learn from them and grow. Have you experienced a repass lately? What did it show you?

 

photo: stock images, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Saying Goodbye To 2014

ID-10099111As the year ends, here are a few questions to help you close 2014 in a productive way:

• What accomplishments made you proud this year?

• What significant things did you learn this year?

• How did you grow this year?

• What are you happy to leave behind in 2014?

• What would you like to be different in 2015?

Honor who you were and what you did in 2014. From this positive point of view, you can make 2015 a great year!

 

photo: stock images, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Are You Curious?

dreamstime_xs_42166511My Dad used to say that one of the best gifts you can give your children is curiosity. Curiosity is an inquisitiveness and love of learning. It creates movement, questioning and an interest in others. Are you curious? Is it an innate trait or was it instilled in you? Do you value curiosity in your own work and life?

Some say curiosity killed the cat, but if you don’t venture out, life can be pretty limiting (not to say, boring). Sure, curiosity can get you in a bind once in awhile, but most times it results in learning, growth and stimulation.

As a manager and leader, there’s a lot to be curious about. What are the best motivators for each of your team members? How can you do a project differently? What’s possible if you shake things up a bit? Are there new rules that would benefit your team? How are others approaching the problems your team is trying to solve?

“The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing.” – Albert Einstein

 

photo: Robin Eriksson | Dreamstime.com