The Dunning-Kruger Effect

Recently I listened to an episode of This American Life titled In Defense of Ignorance. In the episode, they discussed The Dunning–Kruger Effect, a cognitive bias wherein unskilled individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their ability to be much higher than is accurate. The theory was developed in experiments conducted by Dunning and Kruger of the department of psychology at Cornell University in 1999. The study was inspired by the case of McArthur Wheeler, a man who robbed two banks after covering his face with lemon juice in the mistaken belief that, because lemon juice is usable as invisible ink, it would prevent his face from being recorded on surveillance cameras.

Have you seen the Dunning-Kruger Effect in action in your workplace? You deal with all kinds of personalities in your workplace and need to use your emotional intelligence to remain effective. What do you do when you run into people with an unshakable sense of superiority? How do you keep doing your work well amongst them?

 

photo: Couleur, pixabay.com

 

 

 

Do You Work With Peacocks?

It can be funny when we use animals to describe human behavior. It has its usefulness, though, by letting us take a step back and use an image to understand someone better. I’ve heard people be compared to peacocks – showy, colorful, in your face, demanding that you see them. One of the challenges of working in teams is to find your way with a wide variety of personalities. How do you make it work?

A first step is to be true to yourself and how you feel about members of your team. Own and be aware of your gut reactions to people. Then, spend some time observing people that are not that easy to work with. See what you can learn about them and what makes them tick. From there, figure out how you will interact with them and what boundaries you must draw, keeping in mind you are part of a team and that you want the team to succeed.

By being aware and true to yourself, you will develop the skill to work effectively with a wide variety of the animal kingdom. It’s a jungle out there.

photo: anekoho, FreeDigitalPhotos.net