Uncertainty (again)

FogDidgemanpixabayUncertainty can have a powerful effect on your well being. In a Fast Company article, How Your Brain Reacts To Change, uncertainty looms large again. The article speaks to our desire for clarity during times of change and suggests that seeking out information in the face of uncertainty is a crucial way to adjust to change.

So often, when change occurs, the first instinct is to panic and go cruising into anxiety (the future) or negative comparisons (the past). When change unsettles you, seek out information in the present moment.

The best way to bring yourself to the present moment is to stop. Get comfortable with the practice of stopping – allowing yourself to be fully present to whatever is happening. From that place, your view is not distorted. You can choose your next steps and not be ruled by the fog of uncertainty.

 

photo: Didgeman, pixabay.com

Grace

GraceAlexas_FotospixabayGrace is a powerful word with many meanings. Is grace something you can have in your workplace? If you define grace as simple elegance or refinement of movement, I think you can.

How can you bring grace into your work? Here are some ways: cultivate calmness, be aware of yourself and of what is happening around you, treat people with attention and fairness, stay fully present in the moment, acknowledge when you make mistakes that negatively affect others, practice a level of detachment in order to manage your emotions and keep things simple when you can.

Cultivating a bearing of grace can increase your skills as a manager, your ability to work with others and assist you in getting things done.

 

photo: Alexas_Fotos, pixabay.com

10 Ways To Pause During The Holidays

benchpixabay1. Take a walk alone, during or at the end of the day.

2. Go to see a movie.

3. Close your office door (if you can) or go to a conference room and sit quietly for five minutes.

4. Stay home one day on a weekend.

5. Stop whatever you are doing and bring yourself fully to the present moment, three times each day.

6. Look at your calendar and eliminate one thing on it each week and do not replace it with activity.

7. Have a quiet meal with a friend or family member.

8. Turn off the radio or any other noise when you are driving, at least once each day.

9. Sit quietly for 10 minutes, with no distraction, before you go to sleep.

10. Take a nap.

 

photo: Antranias, pixabay.com

Quiet Days

ID-10084546How do you use your quiet days at work?

Do you go at a slower pace? Rush to catch up? Reflect?

Be fully present when you have the gift of a quiet day. Use it well. You deserve it.

 

Hope that readers in the United States had a great Thanksgiving holiday. Thank you to all of you for reading The Managers Hub!

 

photo: MR. LIGHTMAN, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

Sometimes Small Steps Will Do It

ID-100203864Change can be daunting at times. Sometimes, you can magnify what it will take to make a change, causing you to slow down. In many cases, if you look at the change that is called for in the present moment instead of letting your imagination run wild, making the change becomes possible.

Here are some questions you can ask yourself the next time you are faced with the possibility of change:

• Is the change something I am creating or is it being imposed on me?

• Do I have a choice whether to make the change or not?

• Will the change bring large or small changes to my life?

• What do I need to be able to make the change?

• Am I afraid of this change? How can I limit fear’s power over me?

• What is a small step I can take to begin the change?

• If the change is being imposed on me, what is one step I can take to adjust to it?

• What are the good things this change will bring?

Change is constant, as you know. Sometimes, a small change in attitude and approach makes change possible and rewarding. No need to resist it. Embracing change brings adventure, and even stability, to your life or work. Why embrace change? Well, if change is all around you, best that you master it.

 

photo: sattva, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

10 Ways To Stay Fully Present To What You Are Doing

ID-100282431You’ll work better, faster and more effectively when you are fully present to what you are doing. Here are 10 ways to help you do it.

1. Work on one thing at a time, for a part of each day, to get accustomed to how it feels.

2. Schedule one task or meeting at a time. Don’t let people double-book you on your calendar. If they do, make a choice as soon as you see it, regarding what you will do during that time.

3. Work on your focus. When you are working on a task, honestly assess how focused you are on it.

4. If something distracts you, make a judgment either to allow the distraction and stop what you are doing or say no to it and resume what you are doing.

5. Be honest with yourself about time. Don’t try to do two days of work in one day.

6. Start recognizing what happens to you when you move out of the present moment (e.g. your stress starts rising, your mind wanders, you look for other things to do). Be aware of when these things happen.

7. Find a good book or video on mindfulness.

8. Give people your full attention when interacting with them (phone, in-person, e mail, text).

9. Complete your priority tasks first and know the time of day that you are at your best.

10. Find an exercise to practice that helps you bring yourself back to the present moment.

 

photo: Stuart Miles, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

How Often Are You Fully Present To What You Are Doing?

ID-100249700Stop laughing. ☺ It’s worth paying attention to. Why? When you are fully present to what you are doing, your work gets the benefit of your intelligence, attention, time and skill. Distraction or inattention diminishes the quality of your work and often increases the time you spend, for lesser results.

Being fully present brings all of you to your tasks. You’ll work better, faster and more effectively. For my next blog post, I’ll create a list of 10 ways to stay fully present to what you are doing.

 

photo: Photokanok, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Alignment With Reality

ID-10068087Reality: the world or the state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them.

Are your life and actions aligned with reality? You may say reality is a downer. It can be, but it is the best place to start from. Reality does not limit you or dictate your next steps. It just needs to be factored in, so that your choices come both from truth and the present moment.

Say that you are in what looks like a lose-lose situation at work. Do you pretend what is happening isn’t there? Or do you look carefully at the reality of what exists and find your way through it? I think the latter. When you align with reality, no matter how bad things are, you actually are in a very powerful place. Truth sets you free.

 

photo: Danilo Rizzuti, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

How Are You Doing In The Holiday Rush?

ID-100203330It can be helpful, in the midst of holiday season, to stop and check in with yourself. It brings you fully to the present moment and puts you in a good place to assess how things are going. How are you feeling as you read this post? Do you feel in balance or stressed with your holiday preparations and obligations? Is a course-correction warranted? Or, some downtime to regroup? If you’d like some tips for the holiday season, check out my previous blog post, 10 Ways to Experience The Holidays With Ease.  May you enjoy the holiday season and thrive in it!

 

photo: Naypong, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Getting Real

ID-100135697Every once in a while, it’s good to “get real” with yourself. Crisis and opportunity are times when a realistic appraisal of what is happening serves you best. Getting real involves being honest, getting back to the present moment, taking off any rose-color glasses and a bit of courage, as well.

If you were to “get real” with yourself today, what would you focus on? Is there something asking for your attention or something that is getting out of control? If so, go for it. By getting real, you move your life forward in the best possible way.

 

photo: winnond, FreeDigitalPhotos.net