Ready To Venture?

Venture – a risky or daring journey or undertaking.

The holidays are here. They can be a time of joy and pain, connection and disconnection, reaching and hiding and hope and discouragement. Within their energy, conditions may be right for you to “venture”. You can ride on the wings of positivity or pick yourself up from being down.

What do you dream of? What has held you back from pursuing that dream? Are you ready to venture closer to that dream? You may encounter uncertainty. It may take some time. That’s okay. Get started on your venture and by the time the holidays are here in 2018, bet you’ll be in a whole new place!

 

photo: shamboo, pixabay.com

Living Dangerously

Living dangerously can be viewed in both positive and negative ways. You don’t want to put yourself deliberately in danger, agreed. However, sometimes you can perceive risk as danger and, in doing so, hold yourself back. Understanding that there may be some danger in taking a career risk is a way to get started. When you acknowledge the presence of danger you can plan for it and prepare yourself, in the event things go wrong.

Total safety is an illusion. The presence of a little danger can mean that by taking a risk you can reap a big reward. Allow yourself to live a bit dangerously as you propel your career forward. It will bring you adventure, knowledge, courage and, many times, good results.

 

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Chance Or Risk?

Some see chance and risk as the same thing. However, there can be differences between them. Both chance and risk involve uncertainty and possibility. In the business world today, risk is often calculable, whereas chance is less so. There are concrete and in-depth ways to measure risk before deciding on a course of action. With chance, you measure based on assumptions, with a bit less calculation and certainty.

You can use these concepts of chance and risk to take a look at how you make decisions. When uncertainty exists or all the information you need is not available, do you think things out, consider all factors and calculate risk or do you make assumptions and generally calculate the chances of various outcomes?

The next time you have a decision to make, without certainty of the outcome, will you leave your decision to chance or calculate the risks involved and choose the best course available?

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Testing Your Assumptions

assumptionsgeraltpixabayIt is natural to make assumptions about your work and career. However, it serves you to test them, lest you make important decisions based on false or shaky ones. Assumptions about your work and career can relate to the motives of the people you work with, how you think people regard you, what measures your organization uses to assess your performance, the culture of your organization or how good a match your skills are with the mission of your organization.

Ways to test your assumptions include: carefully observing whether the assumptions you have are valid (for example, if the people being rewarded are meeting the performance measures the organization says they are using), carefully observing people’s actions against what you think you know about them or looking honestly at whether your organization is using your skills and talents and rewarding you for them.

Assumptions are risky. Best to ensure that they are tested and true before basing your actions and strategies on them.

 

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When You Find Yourself On A Precipice

cliffJonathan PendletonstocksnapThere’s no question that a precipice is indicative of danger. When you find yourself on a precipice, best to watch out for yourself. It is your decision whether to jump or pull back – you don’t want to stumble. You want to choose your next step.

Organizations and careers are fraught with precipices, some steep and some not. Examples of precipices are: facing a decision whether to take a significant risk, someone having it out for you and setting you up in a lose-lose situation, having to deal with the fallout from a failure or a mistake you made or misjudgment of a situation that brings you to a precipice.

When you are at a precipice, what do you do? You had best be aware of what’s happening, be fully present, look out for your interests, gauge the dynamics of the situation correctly, have a strategy and make a realistic assessment of your options.

Be ready for precipices that are bound to come. You can survive them if you know when they’re coming or that they are already there.

 

photo: Jonathan Pendleton, stocksnap.io

Leaping

ID-100146388Choosing to leap can make all the difference in creating a fulfilling life. Is there a place you are considering leaping to? It may be a change, a risk, an effort you want to make or an inspiration you want to follow.

Some thought and preparation is advisable before you leap, along with the awareness that leaping often involves the unknown and full certainty is rare. At times, there will be much to dissuade you – from both within yourself and those around you. However, at a certain point, you just have to “go”.

Where would you like to leap to?

 

photo: arztsamui, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Boost Your Ability To Take Risks

ID-100128769In today’s work world, the ability to take risks is a skill that will serve you well. How do you take considered and wise risks, versus foolhardy or hasty ones? You develop your skill for risk-taking.

If you want to enhance your ability to take risks, a good way to start is observing in your workplace. Notice when people are taking risks and observe how they do it, how comfortable they appear to be with taking risks, what their risk-taking “style” is and if their risk-taking brings success.

You can take it a step further and study leaders who have taken risks (e.g. political leaders, business leaders, global leaders, citizen leaders). Note the inherent qualities of these leaders, what their motivations were to take risks, any price they paid for taking risks, what rewards they realized from taking risks, how they prepared for taking risks and whether they were impetuous or calculating in their risk-taking. Use their experiences to inform your own risk-taking.

Take a look at the boundaries of your current comfort zone with risk. To what degree are you risk-averse or risk-friendly? Start taking risks and continue observing-yourself this time. Begin with small risks, if you like. Test the waters-what works for you and what doesn’t? Develop your risk-taking style and step out of your current comfort zone

As you boost your ability to take risks, you’ll be a better and more confident manager, ready for what today’s work world demands.

 

photo: nattavut, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Teetering On An Edge

ID-10054314Sometimes you can find yourself on the edge of something and feeling a bit unsteady. It can be an edge between two options, or decisions, an edge that you are starting to step off involuntarily or an edge of conflicting emotions. When you are teetering on an edge, gather your awareness; you don’t want to fall.

You can get yourself to an edge unconsciously and be surprised that you are there. Or, your actions can lead you there step-by-step. When you find yourself on an edge, best to regroup immediately, figure out what got you there and steady yourself. Then, you can take the action that is in your best interest.

Have you found yourself teetering on the edge recently? Did you get yourself back to solid ground?

 

photo: Just2shutter, FreeDigitalPhotos.net

“I Know I Can Do This!”

Is there something beckoning you that would be a stretch to pursue? Sometimes opportunity calls quietly; sometimes it calls louder and louder. To respond effectively, you need to have confidence. Confidence is belief in your ability to handle challenges and to grow.

Take a moment to consider if there is something worthwhile beckoning you now. It could be a new opportunity, the chance to improve a skill or the opportunity to innovate. How are you responding?

Do you have the confidence to go for it? Sometimes you have to take a leap. You may not have all the elements you think you need to feel safe. If you analyze the opportunity carefully and assess your level of readiness, you can identify what you need to get in place and go for it. Sometimes, you may be doing these things after you take the leap. That’s okay. What’s most important is believing in yourself, making a commitment and knowing “I can do this!”.

photo: Salvatore Vuono, FreeDigitalPhotos.net