Indecision

Indecision is tough. Everyone, in varying degrees, experiences it. You need time to make a decision –  that’s a given. However indecision, if allowed to go on too long, can paralyze you.

How can you get through indecision? Here are a few ideas:

• Give yourself a break. Your decisions are not set in stone. They are only set in the present moment, with the information you have available to you. Know that your past decisions do not own you. You can change a decision if things change in the future.

• Trust yourself that you are ready to make a decision. Your mind may play games telling you that you are not capable or ready, but you are.

• Do your best to let go of an expectation that you will make a perfect decision. Such a thing doesn’t exist. You can strive to make the best decision possible for you and that is pretty good.

• Do your best to identify your fears regarding a decision. What is the nature of your fear? Is it real or made-up? Figure out how can you confront any fears you encounter. Act in spite of the fear, knowing that you have thought the decision out as best you can.

You alone walk your journey. Only you can keep your feet moving on your path. Walk at the pace that works for you and keep yourself in motion.

 

photo: nhilbanda, pixabay.com

Mountains

mountainclimberunsplashSometimes, you have to do things that will not have an immediate result or where the end is not in sight. You move forward one step at a time and face whatever comes. It is like climbing a mountain. It asks for your awareness, persistence, excellence and trust.

Can you think of a time you had to climb a “mountain” like this in your career? How did it work out? What skills were most useful to you? What will you do differently when you encounter your next mountain?

 

photo: unsplash.com

Do You Have Allies?

alliesskeezepixabayIt certainly is helpful to have allies in your work. You may have found some. You may also have learned some difficult lessons about perceived allies’ authenticity, hidden agendas and loyalty. What criteria do you use in considering whether someone is an ally at work? Your criteria should be well thought out and protective of your interests. If you consider someone an ally and they are not, they can do some real damage.

Your allies should be proven before you consider them so. Some people may be allies only in certain situations, usually because your self-interests align. Some people may be collaborators, yet not true allies.

Trust and loyalty are key ingredients in an alliance and must be maintained. Too much is at stake. Some say that trust and loyalty are not values that are honored in the workplace. They can be. Honoring these values and having true allies needs your constant assessment, as well as your emotional intelligence. When you do find true allies, you are a lucky one!

We are looking for two people to complete a career circle starting in August. Join us to take charge of your career and make a change you’ve dreamed of making! More info here.

 

photo: skeeze, pixabay.com