What’s The Point?

Often, the question “What’s the point?” is asked out of frustration and an answer is not pursued. The question is a good one to ask periodically outside of any frustration.

What is the point of the work you are doing now? Do you have an answer? If you do, is it satisfactory? If you do not, find one.

Your work should have meaning to you. Know what direction you are going in and why. Get clear on the “point” of your work.

 

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Should I Stay Or Should I Go?

How is work going for you? Is it time to ask yourself this question? If it is, don’t avoid doing so. A job or work that drains you, isn’t a good fit, doesn’t honor you or isn’t what you want to be doing does you no good. Don’t settle. Keep going and, when you have to, answer the question – Should I stay or should I go?

 

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How Do You Describe Your Work?

The way you describe the work you do can offer valuable insights. Work can be described in many ways: the nature of your work (specifics of what you “do”), the emotions you have about your work (love, hate, tolerate) or your goals for your work and career.

Take a moment now and describe your work. See what it reveals and proceed from there.

 

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The Power In Allowing

So many times you can find yourself fighting reality. You don’t like the way things are, so you resist. Doing so does not serve you. It expends your energy and takes your time, usually with little result. Alternatively, you can find the power in allowing.

Allowing refers to using the way things are as your starting point. It does not mean that you accept the way things are; just that you see things clearly and go from there. Doing so gets rid of any illusions and lets you address a situation as it is. Then, you are better able to protect your interests and achieve your desired result.

 

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More Of That!

What jazzes you and makes you happy? Are those things present in your work life? True, there are some separations that must exist between life and work. However, following a path for your career that includes what makes you happy can bring you significant benefits. Too often, our society sends messages that we are not meant to be happy at work. In reality, being happy with your work leads to productivity, success, purpose and fulfillment.

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Work Is Family?

A recent New York Times column, Your Workplace Isn’t Your Family (And That’s OK!) , has a warning for people who see work as family: put yourself first.

Do you see your co-workers as family? It is easy to go to that place. You spend so much time with them. You want to be accepted. You work as a team. It is important to distinguish that “family” as you know it at home, is an illusion in the workplace. You can redefine family for your workplace; however be sure you have no confusion – work is not family.

Work can be a rewarding and rich experience with lasting relationships, yes. However, remember you are at work to perform and reach common goals, that may not be your own. You have to look out for you.

 

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Looking A Problem In Its Face

There are times in all careers when problems arise. These problems can create stress, anxiety and worry. What is your first response or reaction when a problem arises? Do you address it or avoid it? Your response to a problem can greatly influence how you experience it. Looking a problem in its face can serve you well. In most situations, action by you is needed to make a problem go away.

You may naturally recoil at first from looking a problem in its face. Doing so is difficult, uncomfortable and you don’t know what the outcome will be. However, facing a problem is the start of getting rid of it. Mustering courage to face a problem serves you well. Be strategic and before you know it, the problem will go away thanks to action taken by you.

 

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How Often Do You Disconnect from Work?

A recent New York Times article, France Lets Workers Turn Off, Tune Out and Live Life,  tells of a law passed in France that requires companies with more than 50 employees to negotiate a new protocol to ensure that work does not spill into days off or after-work hours. Yes, you read that right!

How often do you disconnect from your work? How do you do it? Is it a complete break or do you never totally leave your work? Disconnecting from work involves your mind, emotions, body and spirit. Far from putting you at a disadvantage, disconnecting revitalizes you, sharpens your mental acuity, centers you and has great benefits for your career.

 

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