Looking A Problem In Its Face

There are times in all careers when problems arise. These problems can create stress, anxiety and worry. What is your first response or reaction when a problem arises? Do you address it or avoid it? Your response to a problem can greatly influence how you experience it. Looking a problem in its face can serve you well. In most situations, action by you is needed to make a problem go away.

You may naturally recoil at first from looking a problem in its face. Doing so is difficult, uncomfortable and you don’t know what the outcome will be. However, facing a problem is the start of getting rid of it. Mustering courage to face a problem serves you well. Be strategic and before you know it, the problem will go away thanks to action taken by you.

 

photo: Lurens, pixabay.com

The Mind’s Chatter

mindjohnhainpixabayWho is in charge – your mind or you? Often, your mind is a master in taking the lead. There are definite positives in that. However, staying centered among the mental, emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of your life has many more advantages. Allowing your mind to be a runaway train does not serve you.

What’s the nature of your mind’s chatter? Does it distract you? Cause worry or anxiety? Tell you false truths? Have you found ways to balance your mind’s chatter and maintain your center? In my next post, I’ll identify ten ways to balance your mind’s unproductive chatter.

 

photo: john hain, pixabay.com

The Uselessness of Worry

ID-10046971Worry is what we call a gremlin in coaching – an inner feeling or explanation that sabotages or stops you from moving forward or acting in your own interests. Not only can worry stop you in your tracks; it serves no useful purpose. Worry allows the mind to take over and dwell on difficulties, often blowing them out of proportion. Worry is destructive.

The underlying causes of worry are real – anxiety, uncertainty, unease or fear – what matters is the nature of your response to them. When worry shows its face, consider what your options are. Do you feed the worrying or take another, more useful, direction? My suggestion is to sidestep the worry, face the situation and find the best way to move forward. Worry is useless.

 

photo: Ambro, FreeDigitalPhotos.net